How Is Circuit Court Different From District Court?

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Circuit Court is the court of general jurisdiction that hears civil matters involving more than $5,000, capital offenses and felonies, land dispute title cases and contested probate cases. Circuit Court has the power to issue injunctions, writs of prohibition and writs of mandamus and to hear appeals from District Court and administrative agencies.
As a division of Circuit Court with general jurisdiction, the family court division of Circuit Court further retains primary jurisdiction in cases involving dissolution of marriage; child custody; visitation; maintenance and support; equitable distribution of property in dissolution cases; adoption; and, termination of parental rights. In addition to general jurisdiction of Circuit Court, the family court division of Circuit Court, concurrent with the District Court, has jurisdiction over proceedings involving domestic violence and abuse; the Uniform Act on Paternity and the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act; dependency, neglect, and abuse; and, juvenile status offenses.
One judge may serve more than one county within a circuit. Some circuits contain only one county but have several judges, depending on population and caseload. Circuit judges serve in eight-year terms.
District Court is the court of limited jurisdiction and handles juvenile matters, city and county ordinances, misdemeanors, violations, traffic offenses, probate of wills, arraignments, felony probable cause hearings, small claims involving $2,500 or less, civil cases involving $5,000 or less, voluntary and involuntary mental commitments and cases relating to domestic violence and abuse. District judges serve four-year terms.
Information reposted from https://courts.ky.gov/courts/Pages/default.aspx